DETAILED PROGRAMME 34th IUGB 2019

DRAFT

26-30 August 2019

KEY TOPIC: Wildlife: Coexistence or Opposite?

The topics of IUGB 2019 cover modern-day themes and concepts

  1. S. Wildlife – human conflict and its mitigation (Keynote/chaired by Luigi Boitani)
    Plenary: LCIE vision of coexistence between large carnivores and humans
  2. S. Predator-prey relationships and carnivore management (Keynote/chaired by Marion Valeix)
    Plenary: Predator-prey relationships and carnivore management: the need to understand interspecific interaction networks
  3. S. Wildlife and human-induced global climate change (Keynote/chaired by Anthony David Fox)
    Plenary: Effects of climate changes on waterbird populations in Europe
  4. S. Waterfowl Harvest Management (Keynote/chaired by Fred A. Johnson)
    Plenary: Confronting Dynamics and Uncertainty in Managing Waterfowl Harvests
  5. S. Avian population dynamics in agricultural and forested landscapes (Keynote/chaired by Petras Kurlavičius)
    Plenary: Avian population dynamics in agricultural and forested landscapes
  6. S. Genetic structure and diversity of wildlife populations (Keynote/chaired by Carles Vilà)
    Plenary: will be announced later
  7. S. Wildlife health surveillance and man-made environmental hazards/ ecological disasters (Keynote/chaired by Ezio Ferroglio; Emmanuelle Gilot-Fromont)
    1. Plenary: Disease management in wildlife populations: why is it so complex?
      (keynote Emmanuelle Gilot-Fromont)
    2. Plenary: Wildlife, Vector, Pathogens and Global Changes: a Nice Poker for the One Health Approach
      (keynote Ezio Ferroglio)
  8. S. Invasive alien species: management and attitudes (keynote/chaired by Franck Courchamp)
    Plenary: will be announced later
    Plenary: Conservation and management of native and invasive carnivores (Christopher Dickman)
  9. S. Wildlife habitat management and behavioural ecology (Keynote/chaired by Peter Busher)
    Plenary: will be announced later
  10. S. Wildlife corridors and connectivity (Chaired by Claude Fisher)
  11. S. Estimating wildlife populations: methodology issues (Chaired by Olgirda Belova)
    Panel Discussion: Advances in spatially-explicit models for understanding wildlife population dynamics (chaired by: Paige E. Howell)

WORKSHOPS:

  1. Workshop 1W: “Towards Sustainable Management of Wild Boar Populations: facing ASF in Europe”
    (Chaired by Joaquin Vicente),
    Areas of discussion

    • Disease risk and overabundance: the case of wild boar;
    • Risk analysis for ASF: need for population data;
    • Estimating wild boar populations: practical methodology issues (ENETWILD will release a practical guidance shortly);
    • Ungulate game (particularly wild boar) hunting data collection frameworks across Europe: harmonizing the way data is collected in order to be comparable (and shared!);
    • Standards developed by ENETWILD for wild boar distribution and abundance across Europe (applicable other ungulates);
    • Control programs at large scale: the case of feral pig in the USA;
    • Towards integral and coordinated management of wild boar in Europe: ecological, technical, social, economic and political aspects;
  2. Workshop 2W: “Adaptive Management of Wildlife Species”
    (Chaired by Frank Johnson and Christopher Dickman)
    Areas of discussion

    • Problem framing (specification of objectives, actions, models, and monitoring);
    • Value of Information analyses;
    • Specifications of model uncertainty;
    • Monitoring in the context of adaptive management (needs, designs, partial observability);
    • Approaches to learning (passive vs. active, balancing performance and learning, time horizons and discounting);
    • Optimization methods;
    • Human dimensions in adaptive management (stakeholder engagement, governance);
    • Challenges and barriers to implementation of adaptive management;
    • Institutional learning (double and triple loop learning);
    • Case studies in adaptive management of game populations;
  3. Workshop 3W: “Problems and Prospects for Beaver Management across the Anthropogenic Landscape
    (Chaired by Peter Busher)
    This workshop will bring together participants interested in issues involving beaver biology and management. The relatively rapid expansion of beavers across the Holarctic region in the late 20th century (after local extinctions in the 19th century) creates the need for better understanding of the beaver-human relationship.
    Areas of discussion

    1. How to best estimate beaver population size and carrying capacity;
    2. The role of geomorphology and hydrology in beaver management;
    3. Regional/country beaver management issues;
    4. Beavers and ecosystem services;
    5. Beavers and biodiversity;
    6. Beavers and other game species;
    7. Beaver management policy: county vs. EU perspectives;
    8. Beaver ecology and management;
    9. Other areas of interest to participants;
  4. Workshop 4PD: “Impact of agri-environmental schemes on wildlife in European Union”
    (Chaired by Bogusław Bobek)
    The publications regarding application of agri-environmental schemes (AES) in past years indicate that their impact may be either positive or negative, as well there could have no effect at all. Therefore, the objective of the workshop will be to present the effects of applying various AES regimes upon the populations of hares, partridges, pheasants, and quails, as well as on the populations of other species of birds and mammals.
    Those interested in the participation in the workshop, should submit the abstract of the presentation, containing the title of the presentation, name and surname of the author/co-authors, affiliation(s), the contact details of the corresponding author, presentation option (oral, poster). No more than three references of studies completed during the course of the research could be indicated in the abstract.
    Please submit abstract by mail to the organiser Boguslaw Bobek, Institute of Biology, Pedagogical University, Podbrzezie 3, 31-054 Krakow, Poland, e mail: b.bobek@o2.pl , phone 0048603673503.
    Areas of discussion

    1. A short description of the study area, taking into account the size of the area where the AES was applied;
    2. The time interval in which the monitoring was conducted should be given;
    3. Explanation of the nature of actions and methods of the AES applied in the study area;
    4. Whenever possible, the results pertaining to the demographic variables of animal populations should be related to the effect of the use of AES upon the increased levels of thermal and hiding cover, food base, estimated predator pressure and reproductive habitats, as well as showing decline of the negative impact of adverse weather conditions upon the dynamics of population numbers;
    5. The outcomes of opinion surveys among local farmers pertaining to the results obtained during the implementation of agri-environmental programs may also be presented;
    6. In conclusion, the conformity of the methods used under the framework of AES should be stated or – in the cases of negative or lacking effect on the environment or wildlife populations – the modifications should be suggested;
  5. Panel Discussion 1PD:
    “Advances in spatially-explicit models for understanding wildlife population dynamics”
    Organizers: Paige Howell (Tall Timbers & Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia; Michael Cherry (Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Virginia Tech); James Martin (Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia)
    Areas of discussion:
    The Panel Discussion will provide researchers with an overview of some of the most recent advances in spatially-explicit quantitative methods for using a variety of data types to estimate population parameters.
    Description: The estimation of population size is fundamental to understanding the impact of management strategies on exploited populations. Management decisions like those related to harvest for game species have historically been plagued by having imprecise estimates of population size. Recent advances in statistical modelling have improved our ability to model spatial and temporal variation in vital rates and density, while also considering the causes of heterogeneity in detection among individuals. Much of this model development has been driven by the advent and increased usage of less invasive sampling techniques, such as DNA sampling, camera trapping and acoustic sampling. In many of these cases populations are unmarked or individuals within the population carry only partial identifications. Statistical frameworks are being developed to accommodate these sources of uncertainty. In some settings multiple data types are available, often collected at different spatial and temporal scales, and modelling frameworks are being developed to integrate multiple sources of data to improve the precision of parameter estimates. In this session we will provide an overview of recent advances in quantitative approaches for estimating population parameters and predicting population trajectories, with a focus on spatially-explicit models.
    Justification: The last decade has seen an enormous increase in the number of statistical approaches for quantifying wildlife population dynamics. Particularly the development of modelling frameworks that make use of the spatial information that is inherent in much of the data collected through monitoring programs. This workshop will provide an overview of some of these new techniques and examples of their application to estimating population demographic rates and spatio-temporal trends in population density. We have gathered a variety of speakers applying quantitative approaches to different taxa and geographic locations.

Monday, 26th August, 2019

Congress kick-start: evening Ice break cocktail

Tuesday, 27th August, 2019

KEY TOPIC: Wildlife: Coexistence or Opposite?

08:00 – 10:00 – Registration & refreshment
10:00 – 11:00 Opening
11:00 – 12:00 Keynote speaker Luigi Boitani
Plenary: LCIE vision of coexistence between large carnivores and humans
Questions
12:20 – 13:20 Lunch
Wildlife – human conflict and its mitigation: chaired by Luigi Boitani
13:20 – 15:00 (presentations)
15:00 – 15:40 Coffee break
15:40 – 17:40
Genetic structure and diversity of wildlife populations: Keynote speaker/chaired by Carles Vilà
13:20 – 14:00 Plenary: will be announced later
14:00 – 15: 00 (presentations)
15:00 – 15:40 Coffee break
15:40 – 18:00
Discussion
Wildlife and human-induced global climate change: Keynote speaker/chaired by Anthony David Fox)
13:20 – 14:00 Plenary: Effects of climate changes on waterbird populations in Europe
14:00 – 15:00 (presentations)
15:00 – 15:40 Coffee break
15:40 – 18:40 (presentations)
Discussion
Estimating wildlife populations: methodology issues Chaired by Olgirda Belova
Panel Discussion: Advances in spatially-explicit models for understanding wildlife population dynamics
(chaired by: Paige E. Howell)
15:40 –19:00 (presentations)
Discussion
Predator-prey relationships and carnivore management: Keynote/chaired by Marion Valeix
13:20 – 14:00 Plenary: Predator-prey relationships and carnivore management: the need to understand interspecific interaction networks
14:00 – 15:00 (presentations)
15:00 – 15:40 Coffee break
15:40 – 18:40 (presentations)
Waterfowl Harvest Management: Keynote speaker/chaired by Fred A. Johnson.
15:40 – 16:00 Plenary: Confronting Dynamics and Uncertainty in Managing Waterfowl Harvests
16:00 – 19:00 (presentations)
Discussion
Workshop 4PD: “Impact of agri-environmental schemes on wildlife in European Union”
chaired by Bogusław Bobek
16:00 – 18:20 (presentations)
19:40 Cognitive excursion: Kaunas City – Old Town

Wednesday, 28th August, 2019

Wildlife health surveillance and man-made environmental hazards/ ecological disasters
Keynote/chaired by: Ezio Ferroglio & Emmanuelle Gilot-Fromont
09:00-09:40 Plenary: Disease management in wildlife populations: why is it so complex?
(Keynote Emmanuelle Gilot-Fromont)
09:40 – 11:00 (presentations)
11:00 – 11:40 Coffee break
11:40 – 12:20 (presentations)
12:20 – 13:20 Lunch
Wildlife health surveillance and man-made environmental hazards/ ecological disasters (2part)
Keynote/chaired by: Ezio Ferroglio & Emmanuelle Gilot-Fromont
13:00 – 13:40 Plenary: Wildlife, Vector, Pathogens and Global Changes: A Nice Poker for the One Health Approach (Keynote Ezio Ferroglio)
14:00 – 15:00 (presentations)
15:00 – 15:40 Coffee break
15:40 – 17:40 (presentations)
Invasive alien species: management and attitudes: Keynote/chaired by: Franck Courchamp
09:00 – 09:40 Plenary: will be announced later
09:40 – 11:00 (presentations)
11:00 – 11:40 Coffee break
11:40 –12:20 (presentations)
12:20 – 13:20 Lunch
Invasive alien species: management and attitudes: Keynote/chaired by: Franck Courchamp (2part)
13:20 – 14:00 Plenary: Conservation and management of native and invasive carnivores
(Keynote Christopher Dickman)
14:00 – 15:00 (presentations)
15:00 – 15:40 Coffee break
15:40 – 17:40 (presentations)
Discussion
Wildlife habitat management and behavioural ecology: Keynote/chaired by: Peter Busher
09:00 – 09:40 Plenary: will be announced later
09:40 – 11:00 (presentations)
11:00 – 11:40 Coffee break
11:40 – 12:20 (presentations)
12:20 – 13:20 Lunch
Avian population dynamics in agricultural and forested landscapes
Keynote/chaired by: Fred A. Johnson
13:20 – 14:00 – Plenary: Avian population dynamics in agricultural and forested landscapes
14:00 – 15:00 (presentations)
15:00 – 15:40 Coffee break
15:40 – 17:40 (presentations)
Discussion
Workshop 1W: “Towards Sustainable Management of Wild Boar Populations: facing ASF in Europe” Chaired by Joaquin Vicente
Areas of discussion:
14:00 – 14:20 Disease risk and overabundance: the case of wild boar
14: 20 – 14:40 Risk analysis for ASF: need for population data
14:40 – 15:00 Estimating wild boar populations: practical methodology issues (ENETWILD will release a practical guidance shortly)
15:00 – 15:40 Coffee break
15:40 – 16:00 Ungulate game (particularly wild boar) hunting data collection frameworks across Europe: harmonizing the way data is collected in order to be comparable (and shared!)
16:00 – 16:20 Standards developed by ENETWILD for wild boar distribution and abundance across Europe (applicable other ungulates).
16:20 – 16:40 Control programs at large scale: the case of feral pig in the USA
16:40 – 17:00 Towards integral and coordinated management of wild boar in Europe: ecological, technical, social, economic and political aspects
17:00 – 17:40 Discussion
Wildlife corridors and connectivity (Chaired by: Claude Fisher)
14: 20 – 15:00 (presentations)
15:00 – 15:40 Coffee break
15:40 – 17:40 (presentations)
Discussion
Poster Session
Workshop 2W: 14:00 – 18:00
Adaptive Management of Wildlife Species Chaired by Dr. Frank Johnson and Christopher Dickman
Areas of discussion

  1. Problem framing (specification of objectives, actions, models, and monitoring);
  2. Value of Information analyses;
  3. Specifications of model uncertainty;
  4. Monitoring in the context of adaptive management (needs, designs, partial observability);
  5. Approaches to learning (passive vs. active, balancing performance and learning, time horizons and discounting);
  6. Optimization methods;
  7. Human dimensions in adaptive management (stakeholder engagement, governance);
  8. Challenges and barriers to implementation of adaptive management;
  9. Institutional learning (double and triple loop learning);
  10. Case studies in adaptive management of game populations;

Discussion
Poster Session

Thursday, 29th August, 2019

Workshop 3W: 09:00 – 12:40
Problems and Prospects for Beaver Management across the Anthropogenic Landscape
Chaired by Prof. Dr. Peter Busher
This workshop will bring together participants interested in issues involving beaver biology and management. The relatively rapid expansion of beavers across the Holarctic region in the late 20thcentury (after local extinctions in the 19thcentury) creates the need for better understanding of the beaver-human relationship.
Areas of discussion:

  1. How to best estimate beaver population size and carrying capacity;
  2. The role of geomorphology and hydrology in beaver management;
  3. Regional/country beaver management issues;
  4. Beavers and ecosystem services;
  5. Beavers and biodiversity;
  6. Beavers and other game species;
  7. Beaver management policy: county vs. EU perspectives;
  8. Beaver ecology and management;
  9. Other areas of interest to participants;

Discussion
Adaptive Management of Wildlife Species (2nd day: continuation)
Chaired by Dr. Frank Johnson and Prof. Dr. Christopher Dickman
General Assembly Meeting
Closing ceremony
Gala Dinner

Friday, 30th August, 2019

Congress Field Trips
Kauno Marios Regional Park (Half day Field Trip)
Trakai Island Castle-Vilnius Old Town (Full day Field Trip)
Marcinkonys – Čepkeliai (Full day Field Trip)
Plateliai (North Western Žemaitija Highland): MMMPV (Full day Field Trip)
Curonian Spit (Kuršių Nerija) (Full day Field Trip)